Category Archives: Activism

Some practical advice on how to help the homeless find work

I recently watched a TED talk by Richard J. Berry, the mayor of Albuquerque in the US. I love the practical hands on attitude of this guy and his city council.  The video, related info and links are below. I’m a strong advocate of not complaining about issues like this (and other issues) unless you going to do something about it. So how about trying something that’s proven to work?

When Richard J. Berry, the mayor of Albuquerque, saw a man on a street corner holding a cardboard sign that read “Want a job,” he decided to take him (and others in his situation) up on it. He and his staff started a citywide initiative to help the homeless by giving them day jobs and a place to sleep — and the results were incredible. Find out how your city can replicate Albuquerque’s model with this frank and optimistic talk.

Video + text credit: TED

Global Learning XPRIZE

I’m very excited about this project and so happy that I was able to contribute to the Indiegogo campaign. It’s such a worthy cause and truly something I believe in passionately. Without education, we will fail to rid the world of the massive problems we face.  Some hard hitting facts:

  •  1.6 Million more teachers are needed in classrooms by 2015 – UNESCO
  • 250 million children around the world cannot read or write – UNESCO
  • Learning basic reading skills could lift 171 million people out of poverty – UNESCO

Here is some more information if you interested in this amazing project:

You can read more here: Global Learning XPRIZE

Image credit: Global Learning XPRIZE

Use the Internet? Time to do your bit, today.

Via eff.org:

Net neutrality— the idea that Internet service providers (ISPs) should treat all data that travels over their networks equally—got major attention this Spring when the FCC released proposed regulatory guidelines that left Internet users and companies alike deeply concerned. The proposal included new language giving ISPs leeway to create a “fast lane” for certain websites (i.e. websites with deep pockets that were willing to shell out more money for faster access to users).

But you can’t have a fast lane without also having a slower lane. And that means everyday websites—including journalistic websites and start-up companies that could compete with established web services—could be slow to load, even as our expectations for loading speed leap ahead in the coming years.

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